Magnetic fields may be the key to black hole activity

Magnetic fields may be the key to black hole activity. According to the data provided by the SOFIA, magnetic fields are catching and limiting residue close to the center of the active galaxy, Cygnus A, and encouraging material onto the supermassive black hole at its center.

Artist’s conception of the core of Cygnus A, including the dusty donut-shaped surroundings, called a torus, and jets launching from its center. Magnetic fields are illustrated trapping the dust in the torus. These magnetic fields could be helping power the black hole hidden in the galaxy’s core by confining the dust in the torus and keeping it close enough to be gobbled up by the hungry black hole. Credits: NASA/SOFIA/Lynette Cook

Black holes are objects so opaque with so much mass, that even light cannot escape their gravity. However, astronomers can study the effects of black holes on their frames. These include powerful jets of electrons that travel huge distances, many thousands of light years from the centers of the galaxies. Some of the black holes appear to be active, gobbling up material from their surroundings and launching jets at ultra-high speeds, while others are quiescent, even dormant.
Why are some black holes feasting and others starving? Recent observations from the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA, are shading lights on this question. According to the data provided by the SOFIA, magnetic fields are catching and limiting residue close to the center of the active galaxy, Cygnus A, and encouraging material onto the supermassive black hole at its center.
The unified model, which endeavors to clarify the distinctive properties ­of active galaxies, expresses that the center is encompassed by a donut-shaped dust cloud, called a torus. How this clouding structure is made and supported has never been clear, yet these new outcomes from SOFIA demonstrate that magnetic fields might be responsible for keeping the dust close enough to be eaten up by the hungry black hole. Actually, one of the principal contrasts between active galaxies like Cygnus A and their less active cousins, similar to our own Milky Way, might be the nearness or absence of a strong magnetic field around the dark opening.
Although celestial magnetic fields are usually difficult to watch, astronomers have utilized polarized (Optical & Radio) light to examine magnetic fields in worlds. However, optical wavelengths are too short and the radio wavelengths are too long to watch the torus directy. The infrared wavelengths seen by SOFIA are perfect, permitting researchers, out of the blue, to target and disengage the dusty torus.
Two images of Cygnus A layered over each other to show the galaxy’s jets glowing with radio radiation (shown in red). Quiescent galaxies, like our own Milky Way, do not have jets like this, which may be related to magnetic fields. The yellow image shows background stars and the center of the galaxy shrouded in dust when observed with visible light. The area SOFIA observed is inside the small red dot in the center. Credits: Optical Image: NASA/STSiC Radio Image: NSF/NRAO/AUI/VLA

SOFIA’s new instrument, the High-resolution Airborne Wide-band Camera-plus (HAWC+), is especially sensitive to the infrared emission from aligned dust grains. This has proven to be a powerful technique to study magnetic fields and test a fundamental prediction of the unified model: the role of the dusty torus in the active-galaxy phenomena.
“It’s always exciting to discover something completely new. These observations from HAWC+ are unique. They show us how infrared polarization can contribute to the study of galaxies," said Enrique Lopez-Rodriguez, a scientist at the SOFIA Science Center and the lead author on the report of this new discovery. 
Recent observation of the heart of Cygnus A made with HAWC+ indicate infrared radiation overwhelmed by a well-aligned adjusted dusty structure. Consolidating these outcomes with documented information from the Herschel Space Observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Gran Telescopio Canarias, the examination group found this intense active galaxy, with its notable extensive scale jets, can limit the clouding torus that feeds the supermassive black hole utilizing a strong magnetic field.
Cygnus A is in the perfect location to learn about the role magnetic fields play in confining the dusty torus and channeling material onto the supermassive black hole because it is the closest and most powerful active galaxy. More observations of different types of galaxies are necessary to get the full picture of how magnetic fields affect the evolution of the environment surrounding supermassive black holes. If, for example, HAWC+ reveals highly polarized infrared emission from the centers of active galaxies but not from quiescent galaxies, it would support the idea that magnetic fields regulate black hole feeding and reinforce astronomers’ confidence in the unified model of active galaxies.
SOFIA is a Boeing 747SP jetliner modified to carry a 106-inch diameter telescope. It is a joint project of NASA and the German Aerospace Center, DLR. NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley manages the SOFIA program, science and mission operations in cooperation with the Universities Space Research Association headquartered in Columbia, Maryland, and the German SOFIA Institute (DSI) at the University of Stuttgart. The aircraft is maintained and operated from NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center Hangar 703, in Palmdale, California.
The results of this study were published in the July 10th issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters.

Subscribe Newsletter

Name

Health,34,Nature,5,Science,73,Space,56,Technology,93,
ltr
item
Scien-Tech News: Magnetic fields may be the key to black hole activity
Magnetic fields may be the key to black hole activity
Magnetic fields may be the key to black hole activity. According to the data provided by the SOFIA, magnetic fields are catching and limiting residue close to the center of the active galaxy, Cygnus A, and encouraging material onto the supermassive black hole at its center.
https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-izICHLfRZlM/W8cLmKqo2sI/AAAAAAAAA8k/JcdCe9aMKfsqXtq9IFe6CZsfd_GRXwxNgCLcBGAs/s400/coreofcygnusa_fnl_lynettecook_cf.jpg
https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-izICHLfRZlM/W8cLmKqo2sI/AAAAAAAAA8k/JcdCe9aMKfsqXtq9IFe6CZsfd_GRXwxNgCLcBGAs/s72-c/coreofcygnusa_fnl_lynettecook_cf.jpg
Scien-Tech News
https://www.scien-technews.com/2018/10/magnetic-fields-may-be-the-key-to-black-hole-activity.html
https://www.scien-technews.com/
https://www.scien-technews.com/
https://www.scien-technews.com/2018/10/magnetic-fields-may-be-the-key-to-black-hole-activity.html
true
8514685892313606732
UTF-8
Loaded All Posts Not found any posts VIEW ALL Readmore Reply Cancel reply Delete By Home PAGES POSTS View All RECOMMENDED FOR YOU LABEL ARCHIVE SEARCH ALL POSTS Not found any post match with your request Back Home Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat January February March April May June July August September October November December Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec just now 1 minute ago $$1$$ minutes ago 1 hour ago $$1$$ hours ago Yesterday $$1$$ days ago $$1$$ weeks ago more than 5 weeks ago Followers Follow THIS PREMIUM CONTENT IS LOCKED STEP 1: Share. STEP 2: Click the link you shared to unlock Copy All Code Select All Code All codes were copied to your clipboard Can not copy the codes / texts, please press [CTRL]+[C] (or CMD+C with Mac) to copy